The Green Apple Bottle
a group of guys going out: hell yeah man i'm gonna get fucked up and if i find a hot girl i wanna take home i might need a wingman just fyi
a group of girls going out: okay ladies remember we're going in in formation B so we don't lose sight of one another, but if there's any trouble we decided on secret hand gesture alpha-6. don't accept drinks from anybody, we just can't risk it tonight. stacey, did you print out the blueprints of the frat house? oh i see you color coded it so we know which areas have the highest population density and which rooms are well lit, excellent. marie i need that report on incidents of date rape from the last five years. thanks. alright, i think we're all set then. remember the buddy system. let's have a wild night ladies, but stay safe.
magicalnaturetour:

Tui in a tree by Brenda Anderson on Flickr.

NZ
kushandwizdom:

Motivational quotes
so-personal:

everything personal♡

so-personal:

everything personal♡

cloudmercury:

my-caliginous-romance:

hey girls friendly reminder that if another girl is being mean to you, avoid calling her a bitch, slut, or whore, because it’s likely there will be dudebros nearby and if you say that they might think it’s ok to say that to other women.  Call her “motherfucking shithead” or “cranberry fucknut” or something that’s genderneutral.  If we wanna change we gotta start somewhere

cranberry fucknut is my new favourite insult.

twofingerswhiskey:

other countries have their figure skating set to classical music and soulful movie soundtracks

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and then there’s canada

fireyturtle:

nicelanderenzeru:

ruraljackdaw:

Hugging shorter people and resting your head on theirs

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Hugging taller people and having your head against their chest

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Hugging people your height and pressing your face against their shoulder

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Hugging people and getting picked up by them

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HUGGING

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Not having people to hug

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Giving a hug that comes off as weird

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This post describes me in every way

tiare-tipani:

Traditions of the Pacific
THE HISTORY OF LEI’S

The lei custom was introduced to the Hawaiian Islands by early Polynesian voyagers, who took an incredible journey from Tahiti, navigating by the stars in sailing canoes. With these early settlers, the lei tradition in Hawaii was born. Leis were constructed of flowers, leaves, shells, seeds, nuts, feathers, and even bone and teeth of various animals.

In Hawaiian tradition, these garlands were worn by ancient Hawaiians to beautify themselves and distinguish themselves from others. The Maile lei was perhaps the most significant. Among other sacred uses, it was used to signify a peace agreement between opposing chiefs. In a Heiau (temple), the chiefs would symbolically intertwine the green Maile vine, and its completion officially established peace between the two groups.

CUSTOMS

There are many customs and protocols associated with the giving, receiving, wearing, storing, and disposing of lei.

In modern times, a lei is usually given with a kiss - a custom which began in World War II. Traditionalists, however, give a lei by bowing slightly and raising it above the heart, allowing the recipient to take it, as raising the hands above another’s head, or touching the face or head, is considered disrespectful.

By tradition, only open lei are given to a pregnant or nursing woman.

If due to allergies or other reasons a person cannot wear a lei which has just been given (for instance a musician who would tangle the lei in his or her guitar strap), the lei is displayed in a place of honor, such as the musician’s music stand or microphone stand.

Lei should never be thrown away casually, or tossed into the trash. Traditionally they should be returned to the place they were gathered, or if that is not possible, they should be returned to the earth by hanging in a tree, burying, or burning. A lei represents love, and to throw one away represents throwing away the love of the giver. Many types of lei can be left in a window to dry, allowing the natural fragrance to fill the room. This technique is often used in cars as well.

  • In Samoa, similar garlands fashioned of entire flowers, buds, seeds, nuts, plant fibers, leaves, ferns, seashells, or flower petals are called “asoa” or “ula”, while single flowers or clusters worn in the hair or on the ear are called sei.
  • In Tahiti such garlands are referred to as ‘hei’ and in the Cook Islands they are called an ‘ei.’
  • Tongans are known for creating unique ‘kahoa’ leis made of chains of flat, crescent or triangular arrangements made of flower petals and leaves sewn onto a leaf or cloth backing.

Many modern Polynesian celebrations include the giving and receiving of leis in various forms, including recent adaptations of the flower/plant lei in which candy, folded currency bills, rolls of coinage, and even spam musubi are tied into garlands. “Non-traditional” materials such as cloth ribbon, sequins, cellophane wrap, curling ribbon, and yarn are often used to fashion leis in various forms today.